Category Archives: Reviews

Review of “iD” by Madeline Ashby

id-144dpiAshby’s second novel, a sequel to her first, is engaging and better written than her debut, but it doesn’t address many of the flaws of the original. Ashby’s novels are set in a universe where humanity has created human-like robots, called “vN,” designed to carry out the tasks that human beings are no longer interested in undertaking. The technology was originally developed by New Eden, a cult that ostensibly wanted to create companions for all the sinners who would be left on Earth after Judgment Day.

Read the full review at The Los Angeles Review of Books >>

Review of “vN” by Madeline Ashby

13033939Madeline Ashby’s vN chronicles the life of Amy, a sentient vN-model robot born into a mixed robot-human family. Amy’s human father has slowed her rate of growth to that of a human child, in hopes of integrating her seamlessly into human society, but when Amy turns five her maternal grandmother, Portia (who is a perfect copy of Amy and her mother), shows up and tries to steal Amy away.

Read the full review at Strange Horizons >>

Review of “Another Earth” (2011)

ea_anotherearthAnother Earth opens on a night of dramatic occurrences. Rhoda Williams (Brit Marling), a brilliant seventeen-year-old who’s just gotten into MIT, causes a car accident which leaves a man in a coma and kills his wife and son. Just as she steps out of the car, shell shocked, to survey the damage she’s caused, the radio broadcasts that a new planet has been discovered in the night skies—one that scientists believe could be very similar to Earth.

Read the full review at Strange Horizons >>

Review of “Never at Home” by L. Timmel Ducamp

51vxdgi-cal-_sx314_bo1204203200_“Never at Home” is a collection of seven short stories which range from fantasy to science fiction, some taking place in mundane, contemporary settings and some having to do with intergalactic wars and alien species. The stories all feature female protagonists and deal with questions of human nature, morality, and the price one pays for interacting with the fantastical. However, the tone, pacing, and quality of the stories vary greatly. Some stories sparkle off the page while most drag on and seem to arrive nowhere.

Read the full review at Strange Horizons >>

Review of “Corvus” by Paul Kearney

"Corvus" by Paul Kearney

“Corvus” by Paul Kearney

Corvus is set in a fictional world heavily influenced by Ancient Greece and follows the rise to power of a character loosely based on Alexander the Great. It follows the author’s previous novel, The Ten Thousand (2008), and although each novel is a self contained story, the two books share a protagonist.

Read the full review at Strange Horizons >>